Prof. Dr. Shahanum Shah

Prof. Dr. Shahanum Shah

Faculty of Music, University Technologi MARA

Leadership

Advocacy, Public Policy, External Communication, Management Skills, Networking

The 21st century musician expects increased professional challenges, particularly when the ideals of tradition, technology, and relevance are in conflict. In this current term, SEADOM will work with its members to identify the essential leadership skills our members will need to provide to our students in order for them to effectively advocate on behalf of their distinctive music culture and practices. These identified skill sets could be institutionalised, by way of embedding into our curricula (and beyond), and help contribute to other essential  music management areas including communications and public policy.



Malaysia
Assoc. Prof. Chan Tze Law

Assoc. Prof. Chan Tze Law

Yong Siew Toh Conservatory of Music

Leadership

Singapore
Dr. Khoo Hui Ling

Dr. Khoo Hui Ling

Yong Siew Toh Conservatory of Music

Teaching and Learning

Pedagogy, Accreditation, National Music education Systems, 30 under 30

Singapore
Assist. Prof. Jocelyn T. Guadalupe

Assist. Prof. Jocelyn T. Guadalupe

College of Music, University of Philippines

Teaching and Learning

Pedagogy, Accreditation, National Music education Systems, 30 under 30

Philippines
Dr. Clare Suet Ching Chan

Dr. Clare Suet Ching Chan

Faculty of Music and Performing Arts, Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris

Research and Critical Reflection

Knowledge sharing, Representing Research, Practice-based, University partnerships

International collaborations in research among Southeast Asian countries has the potential of enlightening and informing scholars, academicians, practitioners, culture bearers and others on the current issues faced in the music of Southeast Asia. This theme will identify common, current and important problems and issues that are shared among Southeast Asian countries in relation to music. We hope that collaborative efforts in research to solve these issues may prove to be more fruitful than research within a limited group.  This theme aims to: 

  1. identify areas in music research that are important, viable, feasible for collaborative research among Southeast Asian countries
  2. identify research grants that support collaborative research among Southeast Asian countries
  3. to apply for grants that support collaborative research among Southeast Asian countries



Malaysia
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Mayco A. Santaella

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Mayco A. Santaella

Music Program, Sunway University

Southeast Asia Heritage and Evolving Identities

Creation, Innovation, Technology, 30 under 30

Home to some of the world’s oldest civilizations, Southeast Asia is also one of the most culturally diverse regions on the planet. Intangible cultural heritage comprises the performing arts at large as well as local knowledge surrounding these traditions. Music and the performing arts are experienced in relation to rituals, courts, folk genres, as well as new compositions and popular music that serves as the foundation of new regional genres. 

Presently, there is an ever-increasing consciousness of a shared identity in the region, which includes coming to terms with a colonial past and the challenges of modernity. Today, Southeast Asian music encompasses numerous experiences, from pre-colonial music traditions, to colonial genres and the development of local variations, to the emergence of syncretic traditions via new religions, to musical exchanges via merchants, to new music performed and disseminated in entrepôts, to 20th century influences of classical, jazz, and new popular music genres.  Southeast Asian evolving identities considers a wide spectrum from new traditional pieces for emblematic ensembles such as gamelan in Indonesia and Piphat in Thailand to new compositions for western orchestra instruments that are reflective of a Southeast Asian experience, be it musical or symbolic.



Malaysia
Dr. LaVerne de la Peña

Dr. LaVerne de la Peña

College of Music, University of the Philippines

Southeast Asia Heritage and Evolving Identities

Creation, Innovation, Technology, 30 under 30

Home to some of the world’s oldest civilizations, Southeast Asia is also one of the most culturally diverse regions on the planet. Intangible cultural heritage comprises the performing arts at large as well as local knowledge surrounding these traditions. Music and the performing arts are experienced in relation to rituals, courts, folk genres, as well as new compositions and popular music that serves as the foundation of new regional genres. 

Presently, there is an ever-increasing consciousness of a shared identity in the region, which includes coming to terms with a colonial past and the challenges of modernity. Today, Southeast Asian music encompasses numerous experiences, from pre-colonial music traditions, to colonial genres and the development of local variations, to the emergence of syncretic traditions via new religions, to musical exchanges via merchants, to new music performed and disseminated in entrepôts, to 20th century influences of classical, jazz, and new popular music genres.  Southeast Asian evolving identities considers a wide spectrum from new traditional pieces for emblematic ensembles such as gamelan in Indonesia and Piphat in Thailand to new compositions for western orchestra instruments that are reflective of a Southeast Asian experience, be it musical or symbolic.



Philippines
Dr. Anothai Nitibhon

Dr. Anothai Nitibhon

Princess Galyani Vadhana Institute of Music

Celebrating the New

Creation, Innovation, Technology, 30 under 30

Celebrating the new theme encourages a forward-looking evolution of the musical expressions of the region through the promotion of musical diversity, transcultural collaborations and creations. The initiatives include collaborative research, revisiting and rediscovering traditional music philosophies through the exploration of oral traditions and improvisation techniques as well as the development of new musical aesthetics and new forms of expressions.

Thailand
Dr. Narong Prangcharoen

Dr. Narong Prangcharoen

College of Music, Mahidol University

Community Engagement and Sustainability

Audience, Non-formal music education, Across the ages, Health and Wellness, Environment, Community Music Matters

The Community Engagement and Sustainability theme will be focused on building a sense of community with music, empowering music to connects different cultures, promoting diversity and growth; bringing aspects of non-formal music education learning practices into education process for young generation; contributing music education across the ages as well as health and wellness of community. We aim to Increase audience engagement and community involvement, helping both musicians and audiences feel more connected with music. We also aim to contribute community by engaging in or support Southeast Asian music by offering activities that provides an exceptional environment for artistic inspiration and musical growth to next generation, education programs, public performances and master classes, community partnership, webinars and cross-site activities, and community outreach.



Thailand
 

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